Marc Jancou Gallery Contemporary

Games People Play

Jacques Louis Vidal
February 9 - March 12, 2011
New York
Installation View
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Installation view, Jacques Vidal, Games People Play, Marc Jancou, New York, February 9 - March 12, 2011

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Installation view, Jacques Vidal, Games People Play, Marc Jancou, New York, February 9 - March 12, 2011

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Installation view, Jacques Vidal, Games People Play, Marc Jancou, New York, February 9 - March 12, 2011

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Installation view, Jacques Vidal, Games People Play, Marc Jancou, New York, February 9 - March 12, 2011

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Installation view, Jacques Vidal, Games People Play, Marc Jancou, New York, February 9 - March 12, 2011

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Installation view, Jacques Vidal, Games People Play, Marc Jancou, New York, February 9 - March 12, 2011

Press Release

Marc Jancou Contemporary is pleased to announce Jacques Louis Vidal’s second solo show with the gallery. Games People Play is an exhibition of analog interfaces, false walls, conspiratorial pictures, and memory sculptures naturally conceived by the artist. For this exhibition Vidal has used the architecture of the gallery itself to design a three-tiered experience. The FIRST ROOM is proposed as an informational decoy of sorts, an orientation, a lobby, a depressurized zone where information about the second room is available, and where a vocabulary is introduced with pictures and video. The CENTRAL CORRIDOR of the gallery, on your way towards the SECOND ROOM is where the business and logistics of Art are at their most visible. Here the gallery has compiled books, and archives of artists whom Marc Jancou has worked with, and who have inspired him. This is the face of the place. Beyond this corridor Vidal has designed a room that will live out what may have become a lost ideal of the Internet, as a place where interaction is enhanced, and not stilted. In this room you may speak at length with anonymous others, you can plug in your own headphones and listen to five different conversations from a different time and place, you can read the memories of these conversations mapped and transcribed onto geometric plants, or you can just sit and listen for movement. The gesture of the show is to demand all as one, a short experience in what will surely be a busy day. It is an attempt by the artist to pay tribute to futurist technologies, and to contrive flaws in the conditions of that future. For no matter what transparency is inherent to the porch, there will surely be something growing beneath it.

For more information please contact Juliana Balestin at Juliana@marcjancou.com